Home Comparing network models for the evolution of terrestrial connections in Central Italy (1175/1150─500 BC ca)

 CCSheaderCCS2016

CCS’16 satellite session “Complexity for History and History for Complexity”

Beurs Van Berlage, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. September 21, 2016

Abstract

The period between the Late Bronze Age and the Archaic Age is a time of changes and developments in the Italian Peninsula which led to the creation of regional ethnic and political groups and to the formation of the first city-states. In the present study, we focus on the Tyrrhenian regions of Latium Vetus and Southern Etruria, analysing the evolution of the network of terrestrial routes as they have been hypothesised by scholars from the archaeological evidence. We want to investigate 1) the mechanisms that shaped past communication infrastructures through time; 2) if they changed or stayed the same during the considered time framework. In particular, in order to understand to what extent the observed results are a consequence of either differences on the spatial distribution of settlements or dissimilarities in the process that generated those networks (cultural and political factors), we design three network models. Each model corresponds to a different hypothesis about the dominant mechanism underlying the creation of new connections. After locating the nodes at the positions inferred from the archaeological record, we start adding links according to a specific criterion. Once we have generated several synthetic versions of the networks, we compare them to the corresponding empirical system in order to determine which model fits the data better and is therefore more likely to resemble the actual forces at work. We find that, in the case of Southern Etruria, the model simulating a simple form of cooperation is able to reproduce with a very good accuracy all the relevant features for all the Ages under study. On the contrary, in Latium Vetus, each model can reproduce some of the features while failing with others, depending on the Age. However, if we add a “rich get richer” bias to the cooperative model, its performance improves greatly.

 

Authors Bio

luce

Luce Prignano, PhD

Postdoctoral Researcher at Complexity Lab Barcelona.
Dept. Física de la Materia Condensada, University of Barcelona.
Martí i Franquès 1, 3rd Floor 08028 Barcelona (Spain)
Email: luceprignano@gmail.com

Dr. Luce Prignano is a postdoctoral researcher in the EPNet Project (Production and Distribution of Food during the Roman Empire: Economic and Political Dynamics), an ERC Advanced Grant started in 2014 that involves both the Faculty of History and Geography and the Faculty of Physics of the University of Barcelona, together with the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) and the consulting company SIRIS Academic. Luce got her degree in Physics (2005) and MSc. in “Theoretical Physics – Statistical Physics curriculum” (2008) at the University “Sapienza” of Rome. She is a PhD in Physics since 2012, when she completed her thesis under the supervision of prof. Albert Diaz-Guilera. During her pre-doctoral stage, the main object of her research was the interdependence between dynamic properties and topology of complex networks, focusing especially on emerging phenomena such as synchronization. From December 2013 to January 2015, she had been a postdoctoral researcher at Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution (IPHES) where she participated in the COMPATHEVOL (Complex Paths in Human Evolution) research group.

sergio

Sergi Lozano, PhD
“Ramón y Cajal” Research Fellow
Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social (IPHES) Edificio W3, Campus Sescelades URV, Zona Educacional, 443007 Tarragona (Spain). E-mail: slozano@iphes.cat

Dr. Sergi Lozano is ‘Ramón y Cajal’ (tenure-track) research fellow at the Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social (IPHES). He holds a Degree in Engineering and a PhD in Sustainability Science. His research in Complexity Science has focused mainly on complex networks and techno-social systems.

francesca

Francesca Fulminante

“Marie Curie” Fellow at Università Degli Studi “Roma Tre”,
Faculty of Humanities Via Ostiense,23400146, Roma(Italy).
email: ff234@cam.ac.uk

My research to date has focused on urbanization and state formation in the Mediterranean during the 1st Millennium BC with a particular focus on central Italy and by applying the most cutting edges approaches including recently Network Analysis in collaboration with my colleagues from Spain. I have and continue to publish books and peer reviewed articles on the development of complex societies in Rome and the surrounding region.

ignacio

Ignacio Morer

PhD student at Complexity Lab Barcelona.
Dept. Física de la Materia Condensada, University of Barcelona.
Martí i Franquès 1, 3rd Floor 08028 Barcelona (Spain)
email: ignacio.morer@gmail.com

Ignacio is an industrial engineer from Universidad de Zaragoza. He obtained a Master’s Degree in Mathematical Modelling, Statistics and Computation. He recently started his PhD at Universitat de Barcelona – CLabB, within the EPNet Project. His research interests are mainly related to complex networks analysis, specifically, in the archaeological and social context.

He got the Industrial Engineering degree from Universidad de Zaragoza. Afterwards, he obtained a Master’s Degree in Mathematical Modelling, Statistics and Computation in the same institution. He started his PhD at Universitat de Barcelona – CLabB, within the EPNet Project. His research interests are mainly related to complex networks analysis, specifically, in the archaeological and social context.